Computer Security Tips

Choose A Security Tip:

 

Essential Security

  • Log off or lock your workstation if you are leaving the area.
  • Create a strong password and keep them to yourself.
  • Report any suspicious activity to the appropriate person(s) as soon as possible. If the activity is relating to your GWB accounts, quickly report that by calling (920) 864-7901.

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Create A Strong Password

  • Try to use at least 7 characters.
  • Use different character groups.
    • Uppercase (A-Z)
    • Lowercase (a-z)
    • Numerals
    • Non-alphabetic characters (!@#$%*)
  • Change your password regularly, at least every 90 days.
  • Do not share you passwords with anyone! Memorize your passwords or make sure they are located in a secure place.

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Anti-Virus and Anti-Spyware

  • Anti-virus is designed to protect you and your computer against known viruses.
  • Install anti-virus software to your PC.
  • New viruses emerge daily so you need to update the software.
  • Only install on anti-virus program to avoid confliction.
  • McAfee and Symantec are two recommended anti-virus programs however they include maintenance fees.
  • Avast or AVG are free.
  • Spyware is malevolent software that can be downloaded onto your computer. It can be used by third parties or criminals to track your internet activities and can cause strange effects on your computer. Also watch for Adware that will feed you ads.
  • Run multiple anti-spyware software.
  • Some software to use is Windows Defender, Ad-Aware, Spyware Blaster, and Spybot Search and Destroy.
  • Keep your software updated!

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Firewalls

  • A system designed to prevent unauthorized access to or from a private network.
  • Windows has its own firewall setting that you can turn on.
  • Only run one firewall program.

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Phishing

  • Phishing is a crime of trying to obtain financial or other confidential information from internet users typically by sending an email that looks legitimate.
  • Be suspicious of any email with urgent requests for personal financial information. Do not respond to it.
  • Don't use the links in an email to get to any web page, if you suspect the message might not be authentic.
  • Avoid filling out forms in email messages that ask for personal financial information.
  • Consider installing a Web browser tool bar or anti-phishing software to help protect you from known phishing fraud websites.
  • Use anti-virus and anti-spyware software and a two-way firewall, and keep them up to date.

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Pharming

  • Pharming is the hijacking of an official website's address, usually by hacking a Domain Name System server and altering the legitimate website's IP address so that users who enter the correct Web address are directed instead to a 'knock off' of the correct page, where user names, passwords and perhaps additional personal information is collected for later illegal use.
  • Use a trusted, legitimate Internet Service Provider. Rigorous security at the ISP level is your first line of defense against pharming.
  • Check the Web browser's address bar to make sure the spelling is correct.
  • Check the http address. When you get to the page where you're asked to enter personal information, the http should change to https. The "s" stands for secure.
  • Look for a padlock or key on the bottom of your browser or your computer task bar. A locked padlock, or a key, indicates a secure, encrypted connection and an unlocked padlock, or a broken key, indicates an unsecured connection.
  • Install an antivirus program from a trusted security software provider to reduce your exposure to pharming scams. Use a personal firewall to protect your data from hackers, viruses, worms, and Trojan horses.
  • Download the latest security updates (or patches) for your Web browser and operating system.

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Updates

  • Free updates are provided from software companies to fix discovered flaws.
  • Patches is a term you will hear. That will help keep your computer from unwanted trespassers and malicious software.

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Safe Computing Habits

  • Make sure the web address starts with https:// along with looking for a closed lock either by the address or down in the bottom frame of your browser.
  • Type the address of the page you are browsing in the address bar instead of following a link. Links can be spoofed and take you to another site with your knowledge.
  • Do not open unsolicited email, commonly known as “spam”. Just delete it. Do not reply to “Remove me from your list” type options as this only confirms to a spammer that you exist, which may lead to receiving more spam.
  • Never respond to unsolicited requests to confirm your social security number, account numbers, passwords, or other personal and confidential information.
  • Do not open unexpected attachments. They could very well contain malicious software that will install on your computer.
  • Understand that it is easy to “fake” or spoof the sender’s email address to look like one from someone you know. If the email seems unlikely, or has a suspicious attachment, check with the person before opening.
  • Do not respond to free offers, or to unsolicited offers, while surfing the Web, or received via email.

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